Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods
Author by: Annette Lareau
Release: 2011-08-02
Editor: Univ of California Press
Pages: 461
ISBN: 9780520271425
Language: un
Available :

SUMMARY:

This book is a powerful portrayal of class inequalities in the United States. It contains insightful analysis of the processes through which inequality is reproduced, and it frankly engages with methodological and analytic dilemmas usually glossed over in academic texts.

Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods
Author by: Annette Lareau
Release: 2003-09-11
Editor: Univ of California Press
Pages: 331
ISBN: 9780520239500
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class and poor families, this study explores the fact that class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children and offers a picture of childhood in the 21st century.

Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods
Author by: Helen Penn
Release: 2005
Editor: Psychology Press
Pages: 219
ISBN: 0415321026
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

While problems of childhood poverty are most widespread in developing countries, formidable inequalities exist in more prosperous countries. A major aim of the book is to address the question of unequal childhoodsand the ways in which they are.

Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods
Author by: Helen Penn
Release: 2005-03-11
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781134359493
Language: un
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SUMMARY:

An expert in her field, Helen Penn discusses the inequalities between and within countries of childhood poverty and how this poverty is recognized and defined through the following case-studies: Kazakhstan - once part of the Soviet Union Swaziland - a country in Southern Africa devastated by HIV and AIDS Himalayan India Brazil - one of the world's most unequal countries. These four case studies illustrate the diversity and complexity of the responses to the attempts to globalise childhood and highlight the need to address the inequalities of childhood experience.

Decolonizing Childhoods

Decolonizing Childhoods
Author by: Manfred Liebel
Release: 2020-05
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781447356400
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

First book since 2004 to look at childhood from a postcolonial perspective and reflect on postcolonial theory in relation to children and childhoods, building on work by Cannella and Viruru (2004). From one of the pioneers of childhood studies, Liebel uses a broad array of international case studies to examine the repercussions of colonial conquest on children's lives and childhood policies today. Looking at how children in the Global South are affected by unequal power relations, paternalistic policies and violence by state and non-state actors, he shows how we can work to decolonize childhoods and ensure that children's rights are better promoted and protected. 'Genuinely ground-breaking. This is a seminal book which works as a textbook, a teaching resource and a highly significant contribution to knowledge. It is characterized by authority and enthusiasm.' -- Heather Montgomery, The Open University

Translocal Childhoods and Family Mobility in East and North Europe

Translocal Childhoods and Family Mobility in East and North Europe
Author by: Laura Assmuth,Marina Hakkarainen,Aija Lulle,Pihla Maria Siim
Release: 2018-07-20
Editor: Springer
Pages: 271
ISBN: 9783319897349
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

This collection explores mobile childhoods: from Latvia and Estonia to Finland; from Latvia to the United Kingdom; from Russia to Finland; and cyclical mobility by the Roma between Romania and Finland. The chapters examine how east-to-north European family mobility brings out different kinds of multilocal childhoods. The children experience unequal starting points and further twists throughout their childhood and within their family lives. Through the innovative use of ethnographic and participatory methods, the contributors demonstrate how diverse migrant children’s everyday lives are, and how children themselves as well as their translocal families actively pursue better lives. The topics include naming and food practices, travel, schooling, summer holidays, economic and other inequalities, and the importance of age in understanding children’s lives. Translocal Childhoods and Family Mobility in East and North Europe will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines, including sociology, anthropology and human geography.

Choosing Homes Choosing Schools

Choosing Homes  Choosing Schools
Author by: Annette Lareau,Kimberly Goyette
Release: 2014-03-31
Editor: Russell Sage Foundation
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781610448208
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

A series of policy shifts over the past decade promises to change how Americans decide where to send their children to school. In theory, the boom in standardized test scores and charter schools will allow parents to evaluate their assigned neighborhood school, or move in search of a better option. But what kind of data do parents actually use while choosing schools? Are there differences among suburban and urban families? How do parents’ choices influence school and residential segregation in America? Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools presents a breakthrough analysis of the new era of school choice, and what it portends for American neighborhoods. The distinguished contributors to Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools investigate the complex relationship between education, neighborhood social networks, and larger patterns of inequality. Paul Jargowsky reviews recent trends in segregation by race and class. His analysis shows that segregation between blacks and whites has declined since 1970, but remains extremely high. Moreover, white families with children are less likely than childless whites to live in neighborhoods with more minority residents. In her chapter, Annette Lareau draws on interviews with parents in three suburban neighborhoods to analyze school-choice decisions. Surprisingly, she finds that middle- and upper-class parents do not rely on active research, such as school tours or test scores. Instead, most simply trust advice from friends and other people in their network. Their decision-making process was largely informal and passive. Eliot Weinginer complements this research when he draws from his data on urban parents. He finds that these families worry endlessly about the selection of a school, and that parents of all backgrounds actively consider alternatives, including charter schools. Middle- and upper-class parents relied more on federally mandated report cards, district websites, and online forums, while working-class parents use network contacts to gain information on school quality. Little previous research has explored what role school concerns play in the preferences of white and minority parents for particular neighborhoods. Featuring innovative work from more than a dozen scholars, Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools adroitly addresses this gap and provides a firmer understanding of how Americans choose where to live and send their children to school.

Ritual Emotion Violence

Ritual  Emotion  Violence
Author by: Elliott B. Weininger,Annette Lareau,Omar Lizardo
Release: 2018-07-27
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 270
ISBN: 9780429874789
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

Microsociologists seek to capture social life as it is experienced, and in recent decades no one has championed the microsociological approach more fiercely than Randall Collins. The pieces in this exciting volume offer fresh and original insights into key aspects of Collins’ thought, and of microsociology more generally. The introductory essay by Elliot B. Weininger and Omar Lizardo provides a lucid overview of the key premises this perspective. Ethnographic papers by Randol Contreras, using data from New York, and Philippe Bourgois and Laurie Kain Hart, using data from Philadelphia, examine the social logic of violence in street-level narcotics markets. Both draw on heavily on Collins’ microsociological account of the features of social situations that tend to engender violence. In the second section of the book, a study by Paul DiMaggio, Clark Bernier, Charles Heckscher, and David Mimno tackles the question of whether electronically mediated interaction exhibits the ritualization which, according to Collins, is a common feature of face-to-face encounters. Their results suggest that, at least under certain circumstances, digitally mediated interaction may foster social solidarity in a manner similar to face-to-face interaction. A chapter by Simone Polillo picks up from Collins’ work in the sociology of knowledge, examining multiple ways in which social network structures can engender intellectual creativity. The third section of the book contains papers that critically but sympathetically assess key tenets of microsociology. Jonathan H. Turner argues that the radically microsociological perspective developed by Collins will better serve the social scientific project if it is embedded in a more comprehensive paradigm, one that acknowledges the macro- and meso-levels of social and cultural life. A chapter by David Gibson presents empirical analyses of decisions by state leaders concerning whether or not to use force to deal with internal or external foes, suggesting that Collins’ model of interaction ritual can only partially illuminate the dynamics of these highly consequential political moments. Work by Erika Summers-Effler and Justin Van Ness seeks to systematize and broaden the scope of Collins’ theory of interaction, by including in it encounters that depart from the ritual model in important ways. In a final, reflective chapter, Randall Collins himself highlights the promise and future of microsociology. Clearly written, these pieces offer cutting-edge thinking on some of the crucial theoretical and empirical issues in sociology today.

Negotiating Opportunities

Negotiating Opportunities
Author by: Jessica McCrory Calarco
Release: 2018-02-01
Editor: Oxford University Press
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780190634469
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

In Negotiating Opportunities, Jessica McCrory Calarco argues that the middle class has a negotiated advantage in school. Drawing on five years of ethnographic fieldwork, Calarco traces that negotiated advantage from its origins at home to its consequences at school. Through their parents' coaching, working-class students learn to follow rules and work through problems independently. Middle-class students learn to challenge rules and request assistance, accommodations, and attention in excess of what is fair or required. Teachers typically grant those requests, creating advantages for middle-class students. Calarco concludes with recommendations, advocating against deficit-oriented programs that teach middle-class behaviors to working-class students. Those programs ignore the value of working-class students' resourcefulness, respect, and responsibility, and they do little to prevent middle-class families from finding new opportunities to negotiate advantages in school.

Social Class and Changing Families in an Unequal America

Social Class and Changing Families in an Unequal America
Author by: Marcia Carlson,Paula England
Release: 2011-06-21
Editor: Stanford University Press
Pages: 230
ISBN: 9780804770897
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

This book offers an up-to-the-moment assessment of the condition of the American family in an era of growing inequality.

Unequal Childhoods

Unequal Childhoods
Author by: Annette Lareau
Release: 2003-09-11
Editor: Univ of California Press
Pages: 343
ISBN: 0520930479
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

Class does make a difference in the lives and futures of American children. Drawing on in-depth observations of black and white middle-class, working-class, and poor families, Unequal Childhoods explores this fact, offering a picture of childhood today. Here are the frenetic families managing their children's hectic schedules of "leisure" activities; and here are families with plenty of time but little economic security. Lareau shows how middle-class parents, whether black or white, engage in a process of "concerted cultivation" designed to draw out children's talents and skills, while working-class and poor families rely on "the accomplishment of natural growth," in which a child's development unfolds spontaneously—as long as basic comfort, food, and shelter are provided. Each of these approaches to childrearing brings its own benefits and its own drawbacks. In identifying and analyzing differences between the two, Lareau demonstrates the power, and limits, of social class in shaping the lives of America's children. The first edition of Unequal Childhoods was an instant classic, portraying in riveting detail the unexpected ways in which social class influences parenting in white and African-American families. A decade later, Annette Lareau has revisited the same families and interviewed the original subjects to examine the impact of social class in the transition to adulthood.

Inequality in the 21st Century

Inequality in the 21st Century
Author by: David Grusky
Release: 2018-05-15
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 506
ISBN: 9780429979453
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

Why are so many types of inequality suddenly increasing? Should we be worried that we're moving into a "second gilded age" with unprecedented levels of income inequality? In this new collection, David B. Grusky and Jasmine Hill present readings that lay bare the main changes in play, what's driving these changes, and what might be done to reverse them. This reader delivers the latest and most influential contributions on economic inequality, social mobility, educational inequality, racial and ethnic relations, and gender inequality. Readers will encounter pieces from top scholars in a variety of fields, including Emmanuel Saez (Economist, UC Berkeley), Kathryn Edin (Sociologist, Johns Hopkins), Raj Chetty (Economist, Harvard), Florencia Torche (Sociologist, NYU), and Lucien Bebchuk (Law, Harvard). The readings spanning these fields are expertly excerpted to get readers quickly and immediately to the heart of the scholarship. In each area, Grusky and Hill also provide a concise introduction to the key questions, allowing readers to quickly understand the main forces at work, the debates still in play, and what's still unknown. The resulting collection is pitch-perfect introduction for undergraduates or anyone interested in learning why we're entering a new era of inequality and what can be done to change the tide.

Multiculturalism in Asia

Multiculturalism in Asia
Author by: Canada Research Chair in Political Philosophy Will Kymlicka,Will Kymlicka,Baogang He,Head of Public Policy and Global Affairs Baogang He
Release: 2005
Editor: Oxford University Press on Demand
Pages: 364
ISBN: 9780199277636
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

This volume assembles a group of leading regional experts to formulate the first rigorous and comprehensive consideration of multiculturalism debates in South and East Asia. Through close examination of pre-colonial traditions, colonial legacies, and post-colonial ideologies, this volume sheds new light on religious and ethnic conflict in the area, and presents a ground-breaking assessment of what role--if any --the international community should play in promoting multiculturalism.

Exit Zero

Exit Zero
Author by: Christine J. Walley
Release: 2013-01-17
Editor: University of Chicago Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780226871813
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

Winner of CLR James Book Prize from the Working Class Studies Association and 2nd Place for the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing. In 1980, Christine J. Walley’s world was turned upside down when the steel mill in Southeast Chicago where her father worked abruptly closed. In the ensuing years, ninety thousand other area residents would also lose their jobs in the mills—just one example of the vast scale of deindustrialization occurring across the United States. The disruption of this event propelled Walley into a career as a cultural anthropologist, and now, in Exit Zero, she brings her anthropological perspective home, examining the fate of her family and that of blue-collar America at large. Interweaving personal narratives and family photos with a nuanced assessment of the social impacts of deindustrialization, Exit Zero is one part memoir and one part ethnography— providing a much-needed female and familial perspective on cultures of labor and their decline. Through vivid accounts of her family’s struggles and her own upward mobility, Walley reveals the social landscapes of America’s industrial fallout, navigating complex tensions among class, labor, economy, and environment. Unsatisfied with the notion that her family’s turmoil was inevitable in the ever-forward progress of the United States, she provides a fresh and important counternarrative that gives a new voice to the many Americans whose distress resulting from deindustrialization has too often been ignored. This book is part of a project that also includes a documentary film and interactive website. For more information, and the chance to share your own stories, photos, and artefacts regarding the history of Southeast Chicago, please visit: http://www.exitzeroproject.org/

Trans Kids

Trans Kids
Author by: Tey Meadow
Release: 2018-08-17
Editor: Univ of California Press
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9780520964167
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

Trans Kids is a trenchant ethnographic and interview-based study of the first generation of families affirming and facilitating gender nonconformity in children. Earlier generations of parents sent such children for psychiatric treatment aimed at a cure, but today, many parents agree to call their children new names, allow them to wear whatever clothing they choose, and approach the state to alter the gender designation on their passports and birth certificates. Drawing from sociology, philosophy, psychology, and sexuality studies, sociologist Tey Meadow depicts the intricate social processes that shape gender acquisition. Where once atypical gender expression was considered a failure of gender, now it is a form of gender. Engaging and rigorously argued, Trans Kids underscores the centrality of ever more particular configurations of gender in both our physical and psychological lives, and the increasing embeddedness of personal identities in social institutions.

Journeys Through Ethnography

Journeys Through Ethnography
Author by: Annette Lareau
Release: 2018-10-08
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780429968044
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

Learning how to carry out research projects using participant observation and in-depth interviews has become a priority for scholars in a wide range of fields, including anthropology, sociology, education, social work, nursing, and psychology. This book, a collection of well-known fieldwork accounts covering the qualitative research process, aims to help undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars in the social sciences understand common problems in the research process and learn strategies for resolving them.Unlike methods books that treat research issues in a superficial or prescriptive fashion, this book realistically portrays, through researchers own accounts, the process of discovery and resolution of conflicts involved in fieldwork. It also shows the costs involved in the choice of solutions. Students and seasoned scholars alike will find the collection a source of knowledge, inspiration, and comfort concerning the complexity of conducting fieldwork. }Learning how to carry out research projects using participant observation and in-depth interviews has become a priority for scholars in a wide range of fields, including anthropology, sociology, education, social work, nursing, and psychology. This book, a collection of well-known fieldwork accounts covering the qualitative research process, aims to help undergraduate students, graduate students, and scholars in the social sciences understand common problems in the research process and learn strategies for resolving them.Unlike methods books that treat research issues in a superficial or prescriptive fashion, this book realistically portrays, through researchers own accounts, the process of discovery and resolution of conflicts involved in fieldwork. It also shows the costs involved in the choice of solutions. Students and seasoned scholars alike will find the collection a source of knowledge, inspiration, and comfort concerning the complexity of conducting fieldwork. }

Ain t No Makin it

Ain t No Makin  it
Author by: Jay MacLeod
Release: 2004
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 318
ISBN: 0813341876
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

With the original 1987 publication of Ain't No Makin' It Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the "Brothers" and "Hallway Hangers." Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and challenged ethnic stereotypes. MacLeod's return eight years later, and the resulting 1995 revision, revealed little improvement in the lives of these men as they struggled in the labor market and crime-ridden underground economy. This classic ethnography addresses one of the most important issues in modern social theory and policy: how social inequality is reproduced from one generation to the next. Now republished with a preface by Joe Feagin, Ain't No Makin' It remains an admired and invaluable text.

Privilege

Privilege
Author by: Shamus Rahman Khan
Release: 2021-08-17
Editor: Princeton University Press
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780691229201
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

As one of the most prestigious high schools in the nation, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, has long been the exclusive domain of America's wealthiest sons. But times have changed. Today, a new elite of boys and girls is being molded at St. Paul's, one that reflects the hope of openness but also the persistence of inequality. In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule.

Home Advantage

Home Advantage
Author by: Annette Lareau
Release: 2000
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Pages: 262
ISBN: 0742501450
Language: en
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SUMMARY:

This new edition contextualizes Lareau's original ethnography in a discussion of the most pressing issues facing educators at the beginning of the new millennium.

The Sociology of Early Childhood

The Sociology of Early Childhood
Author by: Yarrow Andrew,Jennifer Fane
Release: 2018-08-14
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781351612227
Language: en
Available :

SUMMARY:

The Sociology of Early Childhood brings a new perspective to the field of early childhood education, offering insights into how children's diverse backgrounds shape their life chances. This book will be invaluable for all early childhood educators and students, who want to explore the complexities of contemporary society. The book takes us through the lives of children from birth to eight years of age, highlighting key issues for babies, for toddlers and for older children, as they grow and learn. Exploring key aspects of inequality, such as gender, social class, race, disability, Indigeneity and sexuality, the sociological insights of this book help educators navigate their role as guides, mediators and advocates for young children. Whether it is understanding children's emotions, working with families, or understanding the challenges of climate change, this book will help, with practical and relevant knowledge. Traditional approaches to early childhood focus on individual children, often missing a critical awareness of social relationships. There has also been a narrow understanding of children's abilities at a given age or stage, which has ignored the significant impacts of power, privilege and disadvantage. Using sociological theory, the authors unpack how these big issues affect all aspects of children's lives, showing how children struggle to overcome the negative stereotypes which operate to diminish the life chances of many children. This book gives all those who care about or for young children the tools and understanding to become powerful advocates for a better childhood, and a better world.